By Diane Harris , Contributor

 

Your brain and your wallet aren’t always on speaking terms. Despite good intentions, mental tics and trip wires often undermine efforts to save more, spend less and better manage your money, a large and growing body of research by behavioral finance economists shows.

Of course, that’s old news. What’s new: a report out this month from Common Cents, a financial research lab at Duke University, with findings from 38 projects and experiments — one of the largest applications of behavioral economics of its kind — that help identify ways to counteract those unhelpful impulses and improve your financial health.

 

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